Venture capitalists shape the future of technology, and with it the future of our economies, politics, societies and fundamentally, our human rights. They decide which new technologies and technology companies will receive early-stage funding. This, in turn, helps determine which start-ups today will develop the platforms and technologies that will shape our lives tomorrow. Yet venture capitalists have consistently focused on profits at the cost of our human rights. This briefing shows how few venture capital firms conduct any form of human rights due diligence to gauge their investments’ impact. It also highlights the lack of diversity within the sector.

Risky Business: How leading venture capital firms ignore human rights when investing in technology - Amnesty International, 2021 DOWNLOAD

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