Recruitment

In line with the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (the Trafficking in Persons Protocol)’s definition, behaviour of recruiters and recruitment agencies can constitute the crime of trafficking in persons if they recruit a person through fraud, deception, abduction, etc. for the purpose of exploitation. Recruitment agencies also could be part of complex organized criminal groups involved in human trafficking, knowing that the victims were going to be exploited.
  
Regardless of whether or not the actual exploitation takes place, recruitment through the use of means listed in the trafficking definition for the intended exploitation is sufficient to fulfill the elements of the definition of trafficking in persons. Sometimes recruiters and recruitment agencies may not be aware of the exploitative situations that the victims will eventually find themselves in, but may still engage in practices that make people particularly vulnerable to ending up in exploitative work. While such practices may fall outside the definition of trafficking in persons, they may still contribute to the vulnerability of people and a climate in which trafficking in persons can flourish.

Finally, as also agreed by the ILO, deceptive, coercive, or leveraged recruitment is one of the key elements in trafficking in persons.

Visit to Tajikistan – Report of the Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, Siobhán Mullally
Publications
10 June 2022

The Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, undertook a country visit to Tajikistan, from 7 to 16 December 2021, as a country of significant outward labour migration. The Special Rapporteur examined the measures taken to prevent...

Assessment of outreach and engagement with prospective migrants by the agencies recruiting labourers for foreign employment, IDS working paper 571
Publications
02 May 2022

This study was conducted to identify the gaps in policies and practices of labour recruitment in Nepal and assess the outreach and engagement of major formal labour intermediaries, private recruitment agencies (PRAs) and pre-departure orientation training (PDOT) centres, with migrant...

External policy tools to address modern slavery and forced labour
Publications
01 April 2022

The paper presents the findings of a study on external policy measures adopted by the European Union and like-minded partners to address modern slavery in third countries. The study is intended to support the European Parliament in monitoring EU external action...

EXPOsed: Discrimination and forced labour practices at Expo 2020 Dubai
Publications
02 February 2022

Expo 2020 Dubai could not have taken place without migrant workers who make up more than 90% of private sector employees in the UAE. With more than 40,000 workers employed in the construction process alone. Similarly, the delivery of the...

The Five Corridors Project: Exploring Regulatory and Enforcement Mechanisms and their relationship with Fair Recruitment
GuidancePublications
02 July 2021

More and more people are migrating for work each year, making a vital contribution to the societies and economies that host them. Yet researchers continue to document an array of abusive practices that occur systematically in the recruitment of migrant...

Support and Access to Justice for Adult Victims of Modern Slavery
Publications
13 May 2021

The purpose of this research is to highlight gaps in modern slavery victim support and access to justice for adults. First by developing a structured understanding on existing policies and legislation. Then, taking Hertfordshire as an example, understanding how national...

See all Publications