Low-skilled migrant workers in sectors such as construction, agriculture and services (including domestic work) in the Arab States are especially prone to abuse by recruitment agencies, as well as placement agencies, employers and manpower outsourcing agencies.

This report gives an overview on the recruitment challenges to be addressed, as well as recommendations on how to address them.

Ways forward in recruitment of low-skilled migrant workers in the Asia-Arab States corridor DOWNLOAD

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