Evaluations of programmes designed to combat
human trafficking and modern slavery identify
some aspects of ‘What Works;’ however, their
success to date have been limited. Amendments
to funding mechanisms, notably longer timelines,
would improve the evidence base. Recent
evaluations indicate that the quality of the
approaches being used is improving.

Combatting Human Trafficking: What Do We Know about What Works? - University of Nottingham Rights Lab, 2020 DOWNLOAD

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