The thousands of migrant workers from Burma, Cambodia, and Laos who cross the border into Thailand each year trade near-certain poverty at home for the possibility of relative prosperity abroad. While most of these bids for a better life do not end tragically, almost all play out in an atmosphere circumscribed by fear, violence, abuse, corruption, intimidation, and an acute awareness of the many dangers posed by not belonging to Thai society.

From the moment they arrive in Thailand, many migrants face an existence straight out of a Thai proverb– escaping from the tiger, but then meeting the crocodile– that is commonly used to describe fleeing from one difficult or deadly situation into another that is equally bad, or sometimes worse. Migrant workers are effectively bonded to their employers and at risk of rights violations from government authorities. In many cases, police, military, and immigration officers, and other government officials threaten, physically harm, and extort migrant workers with impunity. Those detained face beatings and other abuses. And whether documented or undocumented, migrants in Thailand are especially vulnerable to abusive employers and common crime, which the Thai authorities are very reluctant to investigate and sometimes are complicit in.

This report by Human Rights Watch found that government sanctioned discrimination and denial of status to migrants create the conditions for flourishing corruption and extortion by local police and other officials which remain all too easily hidden from national authorities. Neither employers nor their migrant workers benefit from a situation in which corrupt officials have greater leeway to extort money in exchange for ignoring undocumented workers. But decisions on migration policies remain strongly influenced by national security agencies and their focus on maintaining structures and rules that permit close and continuous control of migrants, and effectively discourage migrants’ rights to freedom of assembly, association, expression, and movement. How the Thai government resolves the relationship between migrants’ human rights and security concerns will determine the course of its policies.

Apart from the full report in English, Human Rights Watch has also provided a shorter summary featuring key recommendations, available both in English and Thai (see below).

From the Tiger to the Crocodile: Abuse of Migrant Workers in Thailand - Human Rights Watch, 2010 DOWNLOAD
Summary and Recommendations: From the Tiger to the Crocodile Abuse of Migrant Workers in Thailand - Human Rights Watch, 2010 DOWNLOAD
“ หนีเสือปะจระเข้” การละเมดสิ ทธิ ิคนงานด่างด้าวในประเทศไทย บทสรุป - Human Rights Watch, 2010 DOWNLOAD

post

page

attachment

revision

nav_menu_item

custom_css

customize_changeset

oembed_cache

user_request

wp_block

acf-field-group

acf-field

ai1ec_event

Briefing Paper on the Sexual Exploitation of Children in Nepal
Publications

This briefing paper has been compiled using information included in the Out of the Shadows Index and the ECPAT Country Overview for Nepal. The brief describes Nepal's score on the Out of the Shadows Index, which measured the country...Read More

Strengthening Protections Against Trafficking in Persons in Federal and Corporate Supply Chains
Publications

This report provides the framework and resources necessary to understand the risk of human trafficking in global supply chains, and can help readers begin to assess the risk of human trafficking in particular federal supply chains. Later sections ex...Read More

Sale and trafficking of children for sexual purposes
Publications

ECPAT International is a global network of civil society organisations working together to end the sexual exploitation of children (SEC). ECPAT comprises member organisations in over 100 countries who generate knowledge, raise awareness, and advocat...Read More

Child, early and forced marriages as a form of, or pathway to sexual exploitation of children
Publications

ECPAT International is a global network of civil society organisations working together to end the sexual exploitation of children (SEC). ECPAT comprises member organisations in over 100 countries who generate knowledge, raise awareness, and advocat...Read More

TAGS: Global