Each year, hundreds of thousands of people from around the world are recruited to work in the United States on temporary work visas. Internationally recruited workers are employed in a wide range of U.S. industries, from low-wage jobs in agriculture and landscaping to higher-wage jobs in technology, nursing and teaching. Regardless of visa category, employment sector, race, gender or national origin, internationally recruited workers face disturbingly common patterns of recruitment abuse, including fraud, discrimination, severe economic coercion, retaliation, blacklisting and, in some cases, forced labour, indentured servitude, debt bondage and human trafficking. This report shows how structural flaws in work visa programs increase the vulnerability of workers to human trafficking.

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National Hotline 2019 Colorado State Report
Graphics & InfographicsPublications

The data in this report represents signals and cases from January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019 and is accurate as of July 30, 2020. Cases of trafficking may be ongoing or new information may revealed to the National Hotline over time. Consequen...Read More

Land But No Freedom: Debt, poverty and human suffering in the Philippine banana trade
Publications

This case study is one of a series of case studies to supplement the global campaign report, Ripe for Change, drawing attention to the plight of specific groups of small-scale farmers or workers in international food value chains and/or promoting su...Read More

The Prevalence of Domestic Servitude among Child Domestic Workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Research Findings
News & AnalysisPublications

It is estimated that there are 17.2 million child domestic workers globally, most of whom are girls (International Labor Organization (ILO), 2013; ILO, n.d.). Despite their large numbers, research related to this marginalised group is extremely limi...Read More

Moving from paper to practice: ASX200 reporting under Australia’s Modern Slavery Act
Publications

The research finds that most companies complied with the minimum requirements of modern slavery reporting, with clear groups of leaders and laggards within the ASX200. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given this is the first year of reporting, the majority o...Read More