In Ireland, between 2015 and 2020, 356 people were identified as suspected victims of human trafficking by An Garda Síochána. Of them, approximately 59 per cent were third-country nationals.

This study examines the policy and practice in Ireland for the detection of a situation of human trafficking, the identification of a victim of human trafficking, and the subsequent protection provided to victims of human trafficking, with a particular focus on third-country nationals. It is based on the Irish contribution to a European Migration Network (EMN) report comparing the situation in EMN Member and Observer States.

Detection, Identification, and Protection of Third-Country National Victims of Human Trafficking in Ireland - Emily Cuniffe and Olyuwatoyosi Ayodele, April 2022 DOWNLOAD

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